Dublin was a city that I had always wanted to visit for a long time, but had never got around to visiting, I suppose because there always seemed to be more ”exotic” destinations to travel to in Europe. Spurred on by an advertisement I saw on the tube on the way to work on day, I booked myself a very cheap flight and a few weeks later here I was, ready to spend a whirlwind weekend seeing what Dublin was all about.

This was also my first real opportunity to try out my new 45-200mm lens – perfect for capturing the vibe of a city at street level (in theory!)

St Stephen’s Green is a small park towards the northern end of one of Dublin’s main shopping streets, Grafton Street.

Crossing O’Connell Bridge over the river Liffey, you get to O’Connell Street. This is Dublin’s ”main” street, and is one of the widest streets in Europe. The street was practically destroyed during the fights for independence and the following civil war, with many of the buildings today being from the 1920s.

West of O’Connell street are a variety of shops, bars and cafes, ranging from higher end establishments, through to markets and real arts type places. It is quite a diverse area.

The River Liffey, heading down towards the docks. This area has seen a lot of change over the past 10 years, and is now home to many office developments, apartment blocks and the like.

The Samuel Beckett Bridge, in the shape of a harp, is the newest bridge to span the Liffey, and opened in December 2009.

Trinity College was founded in 1592, and is known for housing the Book of Kells, a gospel book created by Celtic monks around 800AD with some very ornate lettering and artwork

Exploring the area west of Grafton Street, which is home to a lot of clubs, bars and restaurants.

Heading west along the Liffey to the Guinness Storehouse.

It is true what people say. Guinness really does taste different in Ireland. I never thought I liked Guinness, but I downed a few pints over the weekend and really enjoyed them. It must be the water!