Street Art Of Medellin’s Ayachuco Tram Line

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MEDELLIN | Medellin’s Ayachuco Tram (Tranvía de Ayacucho) consists of nine stops that connect the city center to the eastern part of the city. It opened in 2015, 64 years after the city’s original tram system was dismantled. The trams run on dedicated track through the neighborhoods of Buenos Aires, Miraflores, Oriente, and Alejandro Echevarria.

When I caught the tram and walked through the Buenos Aires and Miraflores portions of the line, I was awed by the numerous large street art murals that dotted the area. When the Ayachuco Tram opened it was decided that local and international street artists would be engaged to help turn the line into an urban art gallery.

Artists were encouraged to paint murals and create sculptures that shared something about what Medellin means to them, with topics such as politics, war, family, and art being featured. 32 murals and sculptures were created, with the facades of 680 houses brought to life.

The area is a wonder to explore. Pieces I particularly enjoyed included a thought provoking piece made up of four panels painted by artists from the “Colectivo Emetia” in 2016. It represents an armed rebel returning to civilian life, now that peace has come to Medellin. Another favourite, by Bogota based street collective Toxico Manocallejero, encouraged me to read and learn about the subject of the mural, Colombian writer and existential philosopher Fernando González Ochoa (1895 – 1964).

Beyond art, the tram line has reinvigorated the area. People stroll along the sidewalk frequenting the area’s numerous cafes, bars, and shops. All the while they are able to admire the art that surrounds them. Proof that infrastructure and art can do wonders for a neighborhood.

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Paul
Paul founded The City Lane back in 2009 as a place to share photos of his travels around Europe with friends and family. The City Lane might have changed quite a lot since those early days but one thing that’s remained constant is Paul’s passion for food, travel and culture, and a desire to photograph and write about his experiences.Paul has a strong inquisitive nature that drives him to look beneath the surface in order to discover what really makes a city and its people tick, and what better way to do this than over a good meal or drink, with a city’s locals, at places that people who live in that city actually frequent. Paul is also a co-host of The Brunswick Beer Collective, a podcast that may or may not actually be about beer.

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