The Women’s Building MaestraPeace Mural, San Francisco

[content_slider]

[content_slide]

maestrapeace mural women's building

[/content_slide]

[content_slide]

maestrapeace mural women's building

[/content_slide]

[/content_slider]

SAN FRANCISCO | The MaestraPeace Mural, which covers the entirety of the Women’s Building in San Francisco’s Mission District, was painted in 1994 by seven local female artists and is one of San Francisco’s most well known murals.

Artists Juana Alicia, Miranda Bergman, Edythe Boone, Susan Kelk Cervantes, Meera Desai, Yvonne Littleton and Irene Perez created the MaestraPeace Mural as a symbol of the contributions of women from around the world throughout history and fiction, and it features the names of more than 600 women written in calligraphy. The original artists and new artists contributed to an expansion of the mural in 2000 and again in 2010, with a major restoration occurring in 2012.

The Women’s Building itself is a safe place focused on women’s issues and focuses on self-determination, gender equality and social justice. The entire community driven centre is led by women, and serves over 20,000 women a year.

RELATED ARTICLES
Paul
Paul founded The City Lane back in 2009 as a place to share photos of his travels around Europe with friends and family. The City Lane might have changed quite a lot since those early days but one thing that’s remained constant is Paul’s passion for food, travel and culture, and a desire to photograph and write about his experiences.Paul has a strong inquisitive nature that drives him to look beneath the surface in order to discover what really makes a city and its people tick, and what better way to do this than over a good meal or drink, with a city’s locals, at places that people who live in that city actually frequent. Paul is also a co-host of The Brunswick Beer Collective, a podcast that may or may not actually be about beer.

RECENT POSTS

- Advertisment -

STAY CONNECTED

13,105FansLike
0FollowersFollow
9,191FollowersFollow
0FollowersFollow
0SubscribersSubscribe