Edo-Tokyo Museum, Sumida

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TOKYO | Edo-Tokyo Museum is the place to visit if you have an interest in exploring the history of Tokyo as a city. Set out chronologically, the museum beings with the founding of Edo (as Tokyo was known until 1868) as a small fishing village in 1457 to its transformation into the metropolis it is today.

The museum opened in 1993, inside a unique building designed to represent an old kurazukuri style storehouse. The city’s history is represented via numerous small and large scale models showing daily life and common everyday scenes. There are also reconstructed historical buildings and various artefacts like clothing, cooking utensils, and electronics. Entering the museum involves walking across crossing a life-size replica of the Nihonbashi Bridge, the bridge which was once the entrance to the city.

Through the museum’s exhibits visitors can learn about important political, cultural, and historical developments. Major periods covered include the early Edo Period, Meiji Restoration, Industrial Revolution, and post and pre World War II.

We love how the detailed displays really bring various scenes to life. Along with the detailed descriptions, which do feature English translations, they really help convey Tokyo’s story in a way that’s both informative and entertaining.

Free tours in multiple languages are also available twice a day.

Edo-Tokyo Museum

1-4-1 Yokoami, Sumida-ku
Tokyo 130-0015
Japan

Telephone: 03 3626 9974
E-mail: n/a
Website

Open
Tue – Fri, Sun: 9:30am to 5:30pm
Sat: 9:30am to 7:30pm

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Paul
Paul
Paul founded The City Lane back in 2009 as a place to share photos of his travels around Europe with friends and family. The City Lane might have changed quite a lot since those early days but one thing that’s remained constant is Paul’s passion for food, travel and culture, and a desire to photograph and write about his experiences. Paul has a strong inquisitive nature that drives him to look beneath the surface in order to discover what really makes a city and its people tick, and what better way to do this than over a good meal or drink, with a city’s locals, at places that people who live in that city actually frequent. Paul is also a co-host of The Brunswick Beer Collective, a podcast that may or may not actually be about beer.

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