Osaka: Kuromon Ichiba Market

Osaka’s Kuromon Ichiba Market was established in the early 1900s during the mid-Taisho era and contains over 170 shops along a length of almost 600 meters. Although primarily catering to the restaurant industry, the market is open to the public and contains a huge variety of places selling all kinds of fresh local delicacies, with a focus on fresh seafood.

osaka kuromon ichiba market japan

osaka central kuromon ichiba japan

osaka central kuromon ichiba japan

osaka central kuromon ichiba japan

osaka central kuromon ichiba japan

It’s important to note that in Japan, it is considered rude to walk around while eating. If you do get something to eat from one of the stalls, stand to the side and eat it before continuing to walk around.

This place was selling a variety of raw, steamed and grilled seafood. My wife and I tried scallops and conk which were raw and, as I suppose seems obvious, very fresh.

osaka central kuromon ichiba japan

osaka central kuromon ichiba japan

osaka central kuromon ichiba japan

Quite a few stalls were selling cold tempura. I assumed that they wouldn’t taste that good as they had been sitting out for a while but we tried a few things and they were still very tasty and crispy.

osaka central kuromon ichiba japan

osaka central kuromon ichiba japan

While the market predominantly deals with fresh fruit and vegetables and seafood, there are some meat stalls too. This place sold varying grades of Kobe beef.

osaka central kuromon ichiba japan

osaka central kuromon ichiba japan

It was simply cooked on the hotplate and served with some salt and pepper on the side. I’d tried wagyu beef before but this was by fat the best I had ever tasted. The sirlion was very tender, and the fat melted as soon as it hit my tongue. It was extremely luxurious and the taste remained in my mouth for quite a while. Up to an hour later I was still repeatedly making comments to my wife about how amazing it was.

osaka central kuromon ichiba japan

Osaka’s Kuromon Ichiba Market is well worth a visit both to try a variety of food and to see a slice of everyday Osaka life in action.

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Paul
Paul
Paul founded The City Lane back in 2009 as a place to share photos of his travels around Europe with friends and family. The City Lane might have changed quite a lot since those early days but one thing that’s remained constant is Paul’s passion for food, travel and culture, and a desire to photograph and write about his experiences. Paul has a strong inquisitive nature that drives him to look beneath the surface in order to discover what really makes a city and its people tick, and what better way to do this than over a good meal or drink, with a city’s locals, at places that people who live in that city actually frequent. Paul is also a co-host of The Brunswick Beer Collective, a podcast that may or may not actually be about beer.

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