Pastuso, Melbourne CBD

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MELBOURNE | Pastuso, San Telmo’s sister restaurant, is tucked away at the end of ACDC lane and has been serving up Peruvian food for around three years. Peruvian is one of those cuisines that’s been heralded as “the next big thing” for a while, but hasn’t really managed to take off. Thankfully Pastuso has survived the passing of the hype to become an established favourite amongst Melbourne diners.

Step inside and you’re greeted with a low ceiling venue. There’s a large, open kitchen and a bar across the room, dotted around are an assortment of seating options – couches, benches, tables and chairs. Inca-inspired tiles and wooden floors match with bright coloured Peruvian posters and a low ceiling to good effect. It’s an energetic, casual space that suits the laneway locale well. If you’ve got a group grab a seat in one of the cozy booths and if you’re solo or a couple, choose a kitchen side stool to watch the fire grill in action.

Chef and co-owner Alejandro Saravia hails from Peru and has created a menu that can best be described as modern Peruvian, influenced by Peru’s traditional dishes and the availability of fresh, Australian ingredients combined with what can be sourced from Peru when required. Staff are happy to explain some of the more exotic ingredients to you, and handily there’s a little glossary to help you along too. Before long you’ll know all about aji, botija, and cilindro.

The seasonal menu is split into several sections – ceviche, street food, fire, sides, and desserts. It’s hard to choose as the menu is relatively extensive but the staff are on hand to make sure you don’t order too much or too little. The ceviche is a must – we recommend the Ora King salmon with a sour orange dressing, Amazonian chillies and plantain chips, which has just the right balance of sweet, sour, salty and chilli. From the street food section of the menu, a standout is the Salchicha de Huachana – traditional Peruvian house made sausage, caramelized onion puree, soft egg, and herb panko. The rich balance of flavours and textures is divine.

Drinks wise, it’s hard to go past the cocktails here, which feature pisco used in various ways. Try the “Huacatay Mule” which features Huacatay macerado pisco, Talisker whisky, lime juice and ginger beer. The wine list, which features wines from around the world, with a focus on South American and Spain, is also fantastic.

Oh and if you were wondering where the name “Pastuso” comes from, it’s actually Paddington Bear’s original name.

Pastuso

19 ACDC Lane
Melbourne
Victoria 3000
Australia

Telephone: (03) 9662 4556
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: http://pastuso.com.au/

Open
Mon – Sun: 12:00pm to late

Pastuso Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

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Paul
Paul
Paul founded The City Lane back in 2009 as a place to share photos of his travels around Europe with friends and family. The City Lane might have changed quite a lot since those early days but one thing that’s remained constant is Paul’s passion for food, travel and culture, and a desire to photograph and write about his experiences. Paul has a strong inquisitive nature that drives him to look beneath the surface in order to discover what really makes a city and its people tick, and what better way to do this than over a good meal or drink, with a city’s locals, at places that people who live in that city actually frequent. Paul is also a co-host of The Brunswick Beer Collective, a podcast that may or may not actually be about beer.

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