Urban Alley Brewery, Docklands

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MELBOURNE | Urban Alley Brewery mightn’t be a name you’ve heard of before, but the Melbourne brewery has actually been around for a few years. Prior to the recent re-brand it was known as Collins Street Brewery, with founder Ze’ev Meltzer gypsy brewing his Once Bitter ‘Urban Ale’ out at Southern Bay Brewing. We interviewed Ze’ev on the Brunswick Beer Collective podcast almost two years ago, and he had big plans for the brewery. Two years on, after attending the launch of Urban Alley’s new brewery and brewpub, it’s clear to see that those big plans are coming to fruition.

Urban Alley Brewery has seen Ze’ev join forces with a few business partners and fellow beer lovers to create a brand that produces an assortment of beers that will appeal to those new to the craft beer world, and more seasoned craft beer veterans. The space is large, and it’s clear that no expense has been spared in setting it up. It’s a large 550-person capacity modern space, with a mixture of benches, tables and booths, televisions showing live sports, and a stage for live music. The brewery features reclaimed bricks, and lots of and wood architectural elements, and large glass floor to ceiling windows looking across to the 25-hectolitre brewery.

On the taps, you’ll find Urban Alley’s four core range beers, along with a few seasonal releases and guest taps from other breweries. The beer formerly known as Once Bitter is now called ‘Urban Pale’, but the recipe is the same as before. It’s a clean drinking pale ale that’s well suited to those new to the craft beer market. There’s also the Urban Lager, Urban Dark, and Urban APA. Of the four, we all agreed that the Urban Dark was the pick of the lot.

The seasonal and limited releases is where head brewer Shaya Rubenstein gets creative, however, and on the night there were a few of these on offer, including the hoppy Alley IPA, and refreshing Raspberry American Wrye. There was also a The Polish Samurai, a modern take on the Polish Grodziskie, but that one didn’t really hit the mark. There’s also a few beers in cans and, for those not into beer, there’s also a decent selection of wine, spirits and cocktails on offer.

We came here for the beer, but it was actually the food that surprised us. It’s a selection of pub favourites like steak, burgers chips, along with other spruced up dishes. Think rare beef striploin on garlic croutons, beetroot cured salmon with crispy quinoa, Moroccan lamb kebabs with garlic & mint yoghurt and southern fried chicken skewers topped with sriracha mayo. It’s all very tasty stuff.

The Docklands location, just across from Costco at the Melbourne Star, isn’t exactly the most convenient spot to get to, but the brewery is certainly a good reason to head down here. We’re looking forward to seeing what Urban Alley start putting out in the future, and can certainly see ourselves popping down after work on a Friday night.

Urban Alley Brewery

G09/12 Star Circus
Docklands
Victoria 3008
Australia

Telephone: n/a
E-mail: [email protected]
Website

Open
Sun – Sat: 10:00am to 10:00pm

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Paul
Paul
Paul founded The City Lane back in 2009 as a place to share photos of his travels around Europe with friends and family. The City Lane might have changed quite a lot since those early days but one thing that’s remained constant is Paul’s passion for food, travel and culture, and a desire to photograph and write about his experiences. Paul has a strong inquisitive nature that drives him to look beneath the surface in order to discover what really makes a city and its people tick, and what better way to do this than over a good meal or drink, with a city’s locals, at places that people who live in that city actually frequent. Paul is also a co-host of The Brunswick Beer Collective, a podcast that may or may not actually be about beer.

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