Aizu Hanko Nisshin-kan, Aizuwakamatsu

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AIZUWAKAMATSU | You don’t become Japan’s ‘Samurai City’ without having a good Samurai school, and Aizu Hanko Nisshin-kan served this purpose in Aizu for a long time. The Edo period school was where the children of the Aizu elite would study from the age of 10. Students were schooled in a variety of disciplines including academic studies, physical exercises, and of course, martial arts.

Across the Nisshin-kan’s many buildings and classrooms, visitors have the opportunity to see what daily life was like for students of the Nisshin-kan, and to learn about some of the school’s most gifted graduates, including the famous teenage Samurai, the Byakkotai. Dioramas recreate several scenes of daily life, and visitors have the opportunity to engage in a range of activities that used to be taught at the school, including archery, tea ceremony, horse riding, and craft painting.

The original Nisshin-kan was part of the Tsuruga Castle complex, but was destroyed at the end of the Boshin War. The structures that stand today are located just outside of the city centre, and are a faithful reconstruction of the original school and its buildings.

Aizu Hanko Nisshin-kan

10 Takatsukayama
Kawahigashimachi
Minamikōya
Aizuwakamatsu
Fukushima Prefecture 969-3441
Japan

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Paul
Paul
Paul founded The City Lane back in 2009 as a place to share photos of his travels around Europe with friends and family. The City Lane might have changed quite a lot since those early days but one thing that’s remained constant is Paul’s passion for food, travel and culture, and a desire to photograph and write about his experiences. Paul has a strong inquisitive nature that drives him to look beneath the surface in order to discover what really makes a city and its people tick, and what better way to do this than over a good meal or drink, with a city’s locals, at places that people who live in that city actually frequent. Paul is also a co-host of The Brunswick Beer Collective, a podcast that may or may not actually be about beer.

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